Know before you grow (or buy, or sell, or transport, or handle.…)

Marijuana: Know before you grow (or buy, or sell, or transport, or handle.…)

By: Jim Pettinger, President at UCanTrade, Inc.

Whether you are crossing the Canada/USA border for business or pleasure, DON’T ASSUME ANYTHING about the “legalization” of marijuana. Some provinces and states have changed their laws, and the Canadian government is set to possibly legalize recreational use sometime in 2018. However, the U.S. federal government has not changed any laws; it still considers marijuana to be a “controlled substance” and does not recognize any difference between medical and recreational use. Attorney General Jeff Sessions does not indicate that will change any time soon.

Marijuana plants

FILE PHOTO: Marijuana plants for sale are displayed at the California Heritage Market in Los Angeles, California, U.S. on July 11, 2014. REUTERS/David McNew/File Photo

Consequently, any connection to marijuana whatsoever, may result in serious consequences. For example U.S. immigration attorney, Greg Boos, of Cascadia Cross-Border Law in Bellingham cites an example of a person residing in the U.S. with “green card” status who works for a marijuana retail shop. If they should apply for citizenship, they could be immediately deported for “trafficking”. And, as this article in Rolling Stone describes, mentioning any use or connection to marijuana when attempting to enter the USA could result in being deemed “inadmissible”, with possible banishment from the country for life.

TradeTips blog is published by UCanTrade, Inc., your cross-border experts since 1984.

Subscribe to our TradeTips Newsletter for the latest import/export events and trade news, and/or call us at (360) 380-6900.

UCanTrade
Website: www.UCanTrade.com
Phone: 360-380-6900
Email: info@UCanTrade.com
Twitter: @UCanTrade

Changes in U.S. immigration could be good news for Vancouver Tech

For decades U.S. companies have sought out and successfully recruited talented foreigners to work for their American based businesses in a specialized, specific capacity. Classified under H-1B visa immigration status, “which helps employers hire foreign-born workers for high-skilled, high-paid jobs,” said Seattle immigration attorney Tahmina Watson, she’s seeing a ‘seismic shift’ in visa approvals, reports Geekwire in its December 2017 article.

Seattle corporate immigration attorney, Lola Zakharova says, ‘the spike in H-1B rejections’ is related to President Trump’s executive order titled, “Buy American, Hire American” which reportedly tasks the Departments of Labor, Justice, Homeland Security and State “to suggest policies to reduce fraud and abuse of the H-1B visa,” reports Geekwire.

These changes could be a further boon for tech development in Vancouver, already underway with the “Innovation Corridor” initiative started in 2016, says Jim Pettinger, President of UCanTrade, Inc.

Vancouver, BC

Vancouver, B.C. (photo credit: Josiah Coates)

As reported by the New York Times in their October 2016 article, “Next Big Tech Corridor? Between Seattle and Vancouver, Planners Hope” , Microsoft president, Brad Smith said, ‘[Canada’s] more open immigration policies [were] an important factor’ in its reported $120 million investment in new Vancouver offices back in June 2016. Microsoft was reportedly aiming to hire more than 750 people in the city.

Microsoft’s commitment to the Cascadia Innovation Corridor appears to have ‘deepened’ as it has reportedly backed a Seattle-Vancouver high speed rail study which was announced at the second Cascadia Innovation Corridor conference, held in Seattle this past September. “By linking our two cities together through cross-border collaboration, research, funding and educational opportunities,” said Smith, “we will spur new economic activity and opportunity that creates a better future for everyone.”

TradeTips blog is published by UCanTrade, Inc., your cross-border experts since 1984.

Subscribe to our TradeTips Newsletter for the latest import/export events and trade news, and/or call us at (360) 380-6900.

UCanTrade
Website: www.UCanTrade.com
Phone: 360-380-6900
Email: info@UCanTrade.com
Twitter: @UCanTrade

People from these nations have no U.S. immigration worries

By: Jim Pettinger, President, UCanTrade, Inc.

JayTreaty of 1794

Jay Treaty of 1794 bestows U.S. Citizenship on Canadians with 50% or more native bloodline.

Bellingham, WA immigration attorney, Greg Boos, and his associate, Heather Fathali, of Cascadia Cross-Border Law are leading experts on the Jay Treaty of 1794. Per Boos, “This treaty between the United States and Great Britain was designed in part to mitigate the effects of the boundary line between Canada and the United States on the indigenous peoples who suddenly found their lands bisected. The rights and benefits originally set out by the Jay Treaty—now reflected by U.S. law in § 289 Immigration and Nationality Act—bestow upon Canadians with a 50% or better native bloodline theoretical privileges unparalleled by all but United States citizens to enter the U.S. and remain and work or engage in other lawful activity, virtually unrestricted by U.S. immigration laws. Qualifying Canadians, defined in statute as “American Indians born in Canada” may be of Indian, Inuit, or Métis background if bloodline can be documented.”

For more information, refer to a paper co-authored by Boos at the Border Policy Research Institute. Also, learn more about an upcoming Jay Treaty conference HERE. (Presented by Cascadia Cross-Border Law and Northwest Indian College.)

TradeTips blog is published by UCanTrade, Inc., your cross-border experts since 1984.

Subscribe to our TradeTips Newsletter for the latest import/export events and trade news, and/or call us at (360) 380-6900.

UCanTrade
Website: www.UCanTrade.com
Phone: 360-380-6900
Email: info@UCanTrade.com
Twitter: @UCanTrade